Names and Stories

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This is Jack and his Mama, Shadow. Shadow, and Jack (and Jacks sister, Jill) came to us together. They were our first cattle. The was no way to resist calling him Jack, since his sister was already named Jill! Jack was a funny guy, who liked to kick up his heels at the most unexpected time. Good thing that when you have cattle with horns you are expecting the unexpected all the time!

runaway

This is Runaway. He came to us with his Mama Caramel about a year after we got our first Cattle. His name is Runaway for well, obvious reasons! Little Runaway always found a way to be on the other side of the fence! He had a beautiful reddish coat and managed to continue to nurse till his last day, leaving him with a bit more fat on him than Jack. Runaway gave us quite a scare when he knocked his horn off over a year ago. I am a nurse and personally never saw so much frank red blood. It was one of our green horn experiences that when we got through it we realized that we had another challenge under our belt that resulted in success. This always feels good, of course then there are always new challenges that come up that we aren’t sure how to handle either, till it happens!

I can not say how many people have said about out animals, “oh you can’t name them”, explaining that then it will be too hard to take them to the dinner table. I’m not sure why not naming them makes anything easier,  perhaps people feel that if I don’t name them then I will have less connection making it more comfortable for me to process them? I don’t want to be more comfortable. I want to know the animals, and have a connection. We want to feel what we are doing, completely, and we do.

runaway and jack

This is Jack and Runaway, they have names and stories.

I do not wish to forget them or their names. This is the morning that they went into the processor. They were our very first beef to process. I wouldn’t say it was a hard decision, that day, to process them, because that very hard decision had been made long ago, but it was deeply felt, knowing we were going to end the lives of these beautiful large creatures. We are beyond grateful, to them, for the food they put on our table, and the meat we sell retail from our freezer will help pay for the exorbitant costs of purchasing and licensing our freezer, insuring our meat business, and getting our LLC formed. This is the beginning of our farm business.

Every time we process animals we know why we are doing it and we feel good that we gave them a peaceful and safe life with good food to eat. We also feel good, literally knowing our meat, and how and where it was raised. We are meat eaters and it feels profoundly good to know that we’ve taken responsibility for providing for ourselves. Not everyone who wants to do this has the opportunity to, and we are so very grateful we can do this.

Here is our beef.

hanging beef

The two steers hanging in the foreground are ours. The butcher kindly took the time to let me come in and see them hanging, to learn a bit more about what we are doing. He shared thoughts with me, and he has been doing this for 40 odd years, so it was helpful. It was startling to see the other room of cows that had the grain fed beef. Wow, what a difference. They were completely white with fat as compared to the “red” cows you see up above. He thought they looked just right for grass fed, which we enjoyed hearing. We picked it up about 3 weeks later and happened to have company the next night because it was basically Deer Camp 2015 here this year, with lots of people in and out and even some out of town guests. We cooked 6 different cuts between the steaks, burgers and a slow cooked roast. We had concerns since it was our first time. Were our grasses good enough? Did they get enough to eat? Would they be too lean? All of our worries dissolved away when we shared our beef sampling meal together. Everything tasted wonderful. Nothing was dry, all cuts were full of flavor and we couldn’t have been happier with our product. We had our first beef sale yesterday, and it felt great knowing that we were providing them with delicious meat!

We have learned and grown so much since we started this 3 years ago, (and of course we have so much more to learn), but I couldn’t possibly be more pleased with our progress. I knew this growth would be an incremental process and in looking back on this blog I am reminded of some of the many steps we took. We started with 3 cows, and the next year we added 12 chicks, and 2 hogs, then another cow, a bull and a young bull. The next year we had 3 hogs, 9 cattle and 24 chicks. This year we had no hogs, because we were processing our first 2 beef (no more freezer space). We had 58 chicks this year and processed 50 of them, we also sold our first calf this year. Additionally we have learned so many new things…hubby has built three chicken coops, installed an automatic waterer, added miles of fencing for the cattle, and kept us warm with ample firewood. We learned about new mushrooms to find, how to tap many different types of trees, doubled our garden space and I even learned to get over my canning disaster of 1985. The pantry is loaded with canned and dried foods, I have learned to ferment successfully and learned how to blanch veggies for the freezer without turning them to mush. We buy very little at the store anymore, what with chicken, beef, eggs, a large vegetable garden, apples, pears, berries, grapes and rhubarb we only lack for dairy and I do barter for goat milk when I can get out to the goat farm. We have learned to barter all kinds of things, and it always is a win-win for all involved. Sorry to quote a T-shirt but Life is Good!

I wonder what I will be looking back on a year from now?

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