When loading and unloading doesn’t go as planned…

on grass

Hubby came in the night before loading up and said, he’d run them through the chute, all was smooth, all gates looked good and so we went to bed thinking things would go close to as planned.

The next morning our helpful neighbor came in his truck hauling his older trailer and we were ready. The 2 steers were separated and ready to send through the chute and into the waiting trailer. As he encouraged the first one and then started to close the gate behind it, which should in turn gently force him, by the nature of the set up, into the narrowing chute and onto the truck. As the gate closed this steer literally jumped straight up and over the 5 plus foot fence. This was something we had not run into yet. Greenhorns. There is no reason to know why he did that and others hadn’t but it may be that the gate was closed at a speed that was just more than he could emotionally handle and he went for flight and thankfully not fight. He knocked a board down and so Hubby nailed it in with special nails so it would be in tighter. We repeated the procedure and that animal did it again, except this time he busted the top two boards. Hubby put up an oak board this time and raised it higher and with that and a bit of good luck the animal did as he was supposed to and walked right into the trailer to get the hay that was waiting for him. Now the gate was locked in the front of the trailer and we successfully loaded the second one into the second compartment, and with great relief, drove in the truck behind the our farmer friend who was hauling our feisty animals.

As we rode there, in the car, and thought the hard part was over, we discussed that morning’s loading and what might have created the problems, and how we can change things next time either in the way we move the animals, the materials we’ve used, or our physical set up. We got to the locker, which is a short ride from home, and waited while someone unloaded their unruly pigs. I don’t know why it didn’t occur to me that we could have the same problem, I assumed it was going to go as smoothly as last year. Well, you know the thing about assumptions. We offloaded the first one and then we quickly realized the second one now had the run of the trailer and was not going to make this easy. The last thing we wanted was more tussle as we do all we can to move the animals calmly and not overly upset or stress them, but after enough trying I asked, can’t we put him down in the trailer? The reply was for another $20 bucks, which at that moment seemed cheap, so within in a minute he was down.

We will get better at this, we will keep learning, but we also will be greenhorns for quite a while yet.

As the blood rolled out of the rusted holes, in the bottom of the old trailer, and pooled in the lot, I was reminded that when you are working with animals, there is no being sure you’ve planned for everything.

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